Canola Council of Canada - Encourages Producers To Check Crops For Sclerotinia

If you are a Canola grower and there is enough moisture in the field around lunch-time or mid-afternoon for your pants to get wet while walking through it, then you might want to consider using a fungicide for sclerotinia. That is according to the Agronomy Specialist for the Canola Council of Canada in East Central Alberta. Keith Gabert encourages producers to try that test if you have a good enough crop and want to use a fungicide to protect the yield. He says sclerotinia is fungal disease which affects a lot of broad leaf crops.

Sclerotinia is a fungal disease which affects a lot of broad leaf crops such as peas, field beans and canola.

Keith Gabert - Agronomy Specialist for the Canola Council of Canada in East Central Alberta - says the mushrooms which produce the spores for this disease are shaped a little bit like tiny tan coloured golf tee.

If the spores - with a bit of extra moisture - land down in the leaf axles, they can cause a fungal infection. It will then basically choke off the nutrients trying to go higher up the plant from there.

Gabert discusses when the best time is to add a fungicide to protect against sclerotinia.

Unfortunately, he notes that sclerotinia is not a disease you can see in advance.

Meantime, in early June canola crops in the region looked a little scraggly, but now with the rain that has fallen Gabert says there is potential for a pretty good yield in a number of cases.

Producers can visit the canolacouncil.org website for the latest information and to sign up for the Canola Council of Canada's newsletter.

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